Lithium-ion Batteries in Caravans and Motorhomes

Lithium-ion batteries in caravans and motorhomes deliver a lot of energy and pack a lot of power but need specialised knowledge to be used safely and reliably. Here's how and why for the LiFePO4 variety used in homes and RVs.

Energy and Power are Not the Same

Energy enables work to be done. Power relates to how fast that energy is used. A marathon runner needs energy - a competition weightlifter primarily needs power.

The energy needed to start a big 4WD is tiny - about that drawn by a 5 watt LED in an hour - but when starting an engine, that energy is used in a second or two. As with a weightlifter, it demands a lot of power.

Apart from a microwave oven, most RV ‘domestic’ loads need only small amounts of energy and power. They are more marathon runner-like.

LiFePO4s are widely (and correctly) promoted as combining both high energy and power, but such power has no value unless truly needed. If weight is no issue, a 300 amp hour AGM battery bank is adequate for any RV load.

For RV use, the very real benefit of LiFePO4 batteries is that they are only a third or so the size and weight of conventional lead acid deep cycle batteries and the even heavier AGMs. All supply that massive high peak power yet double as deep cycle batteries.

This graph shows the typical (per cell) voltage during discharge. That most probable for an RV is slightly above the blue line. (That shown by the red line is of extremely high constant discharge. It does not apply to caravan and motorhome use.

This graph shows the typical (per cell) voltage during discharge. That most probable for an RV is slightly above the blue line. (That shown by the red line is of extremely high constant discharge. It does not apply to caravan and motorhome use.

Lithium-ion Batteries: Almost Constant Voltage

Unlike almost all other rechargeable batteries, LiFePO4 voltage remains almost constant: typically 13.1-12.9 volts in RV use. They may also be routinely discharged (to about 20% remaining). As most others have far shorter longevity if routinely discharged below 50%, this results in a 100 amp hour LiFePO4 having the usable capacity of 130 -140 amp hour of most else.

LiFePO4s may suffer damage or are ruined if totally discharged. To preclude this they are protected by an associated battery management system.

Cell Monitoring is Essential

Charging voltage too is critical: the upper safety limit of a LiFePo4 cell is about 4.2 volts. Another risk is that if an unbalanced cell is totally discharged, remaining cells may reverse that cell's polarity. Subsequently attempting to recharge (warns EV Australia) 'carries a significant risk of catastrophic failure'. In practice, the obligatory cell management system safeguards against all this.

Control of charging and discharging voltage and current is also essential. This may be done by the battery management system or by the battery charger. LiFePO4 cell management is essential - but not necessarily supplied.

Charging

Many LiFePO4 users have strong views about charging. All regard cell management as vital. Most agree that discharge be limited to about 10% remaining. Not all agree about the final state of charge, specifically how close to 100% charging is safe.

Most agree a 12 volt LiFePO4 is safe to charge to 80%-85%, at a constant 13.6 volts. Many DIY users do so. If then discharged to 10%, usable capacity is 70%-75%. The LiFePO4 industry, however, maintains that deeper charging enables safe use of close to full capacity.

Regarding charging efficiency, LiFePO4 is way ahead. Vendors claims of 95% are probably true - that of lead-acid batteries is about 80%.

This graph shows the relationship between the charging voltage, current and a typical LiFePO4's state of charge.

This graph shows the relationship between the charging voltage, current and a typical LiFePO4's state of charge.

Usable Lifespan

The battery industry defines its products’ lifespan as cycles that can be drawn before capacity falls to 80% of that when new. This lifespan closely relates to the ongoing depth of discharge of conventional batteries. Many users and vendors, however, claim that LiFePO4 lifespan (in RV usage) is barely affected by discharge rate or depth. They usually claim about 2000 cycles if discharged to 20% remaining (almost regardless of load). They suggest life is extended by limiting the charge to 90%. 

Battery Chargers

Some LiFePO4 makers advise that, given battery monitoring/charge control, all required is a two-stage charger. Not all agree. RV Books’ opinion is that LiFePO4 chargers are safer.

Alternator and/or Solar Charging

Some LiFePO4 users claim ‘normal’ alternator charging is fine, but that cannot be: there has been no such thing as a ‘normal' alternator since 2000. From thereon alternator outputs began to vary, from 12.7 volts to plus 14.7 volts. Many have voltage that varies with load and/or temperature. Some now have voltage that varies from plus 15 to 12.3 volts. Or even none at all at times. Only a very few LiFePO4 batteries are promoted as ‘drop-in’ replacements. 

Redarc and Sterling produce alternator chargers specifically for LiFePO4, or with a LiFePO4 option. Such chargers include under/over voltage protection and cell balancing. Some also accept solar input. Redarc stresses that their LiFePo4 chargers should only be used with batteries that they approve. 

The (Australian designed and made) Redarc LFP 1240 alternator. It charges a LiFePO4 12 volt battery at 40 amps. It also accepts input from solar modules. Pic: Redarc

The (Australian designed and made) Redarc LFP 1240 alternator. It charges a LiFePO4 12 volt battery at 40 amps. It also accepts input from solar modules. Pic: Redarc

Buying LiFePO4 Batteries

Currently, all lithium-ion batteries are imports. Some have several levels of distribution – each adding a profit margin. Prices for identical batteries, but of different brand names, vary hugely. Their prices may fall but a major decrease is less probable as lithium sources are limited.

The essential battery management system is not necessarily supplied. Unless totally sure of what you are doing, buy only LiFePO4 batteries with that management system inbuilt. Advise the vendor of the intended usage. Obtain written assurance they are suitable for that usage.

 Should I Use Lithium-ion Batteries in Caravans and Motorhomes?

When buyers can obtain truly direct drop-in replacements, LiFePO4 batteries in RVs make every sense. In the meantime, RV Books advises caution. Buy only from a truly reputable source.

Installing LiFePO4 Batteries

Apart from advising that you should locate the LiFePO4 charger close to the battery bank (not the alternator), the installation of alternator chargers is far too complex to explain in article form. It is however fully covered in our associated Caravan & Motorhome Electrics

This area constantly changes - so this article is accordingly updated when necessary.

why not buy a book?

This article is based on content from our featured RV books. These books contain extensive information on a range of topics of interest to RV users and potential buyers. By purchasing a book, you are not only educating yourself but also supporting the work of independent RV writers. If you have found this article useful, please also visit the RV Bookshop.

 

This product has been added to your cart

CHECKOUT